Anthony Diiorio, Ethereum | Polycon 2018

Anthony Diiorio, Ethereum | Polycon 2018


>>Announcer: Live from
Nassau in the Bahamas. It’s the Cube, covering Polycon 18. Brought to you by Polymath.>>Hey, welcome back everyone. We’re here, live in the
Bahamas for Polycon 18. It’s the Cube’s exclusive
coverage for day one, wrapping up the segment here. I’m John Furrier with
my coach Dave Vellante, co-founder with me at
SiliconANGLE media at the Cube. Our guest wrap-up, old co-host. Anthony Di Iorio, co-founder of Ethereum also CEO of Jaxx and Decentral. We had a great chat yesterday. Welcome to joining our
wrap-up for day one.>>Thanks for having me on again.>>Yeah, we do live this time.>>Alright that’s a lot better.>>Kay, got it, genies out
of the bottle on everything so we had bloopers on the last segment, little water break but on serious note, Dave and I want to wrap up the show. We do this every time. Day one, a lot of
excitement from the panels. People in the hallway were
buzzing, people doing deals. A lot of intimate conversations, Dave we see this early on at these shows. Anthony you’ve been out
hallways, in sessions, talking to people in
meetings, getting things done. What’s the day one wrap-up for you like? What’s happened here?>>So I’m a little bit
different at events, I don’t attend many of the
sessions, I never have. This is more of a way for me to connect with people that I
haven’t seen for a while. I try not to do too many
conferences anymore. I’ve been doing this for six years now, in the Blockchain space and I
realized a couple years ago, it’s really about focusing
on what I need to do. So this was a little bit different. I did the keynote here yesterday and I’d asked if I could
send my hologram instead but they’re like, no, you got to come. We can’t do that. So generally at my conferences, I don’t really do many of the sessions. I’m, you know, just chilling out and kind of use them as vacation times too but it has been pretty busy. It has been good, I’ve
had a number of meetings and yeah it’s quite a good buzz.>>What are some of the
things you’re talking with your friends and colleagues and partners in the
business and the industry? Is it tech? You talking tech, you talking personal? What are some of the things going on here? Because these events have
a mishmash of all that.>>Yeah, I try to keep them both ways. There’s business and personal stuff. I think, business I’m just
going to get drained too much and it’s nice to make
things a little bit lighter. A lot of my meetings have been with people that are, they’re looking
to know what’s going on. People, you know think
about security tokens now and it’s a change from the
traditional utility tokens and it’s a lot of just
trying to pick my brain about what’s happening, what am I seeing, what am I investigating, what are the different
things that I’m looking for. It’s that. Meeting people that I haven’t
been able to connect with for a while which is always good. Aligning other events and things coming up and then also spending quite a bit of day by the pool and catching up on emails. You got to make sure you do that stuff.>>Good, I wish I could have been there. We’re doing interviews all day but we’re doing whatever it
takes get the videos out there. We had some interesting guests on, We’ll get your reaction to. We had Hartej Sawhney who’s, Oshi.io, co-founder, they do
audits on smart contracts.>>Yeah.
>>And some other folks. But the general observation,
I don’t think he said this but he was kind of
validating and other things that Ethereum is by far the
most developer-oriented chain. It has a lot more traction
and smart contracts are getting better and better. We’ve been trying to
get, kind of an answer, just kind of order-of-magnitude relevant to developer
communities, what is a ballpark order-of-magnitude percentage in your mind of developers on the platforms? Is it is the Ethereum the largest?>>Yeah I’d say so, it
was really interesting. We were really good at
setting up the communities and we really were focused on devs. There was a lot of setup
in the initial structures that was more business oriented but after the crowd sale, everything was down to developers
building up communities because that’s what we needed. People to actually
develop on the platform.>>John: Yeah, of course.>>And Ethereum just had a way, I think it’s mostly because
of Italic, because of Gavin. They just was a developer project and I think that’s what
attracted a lot of the people to start building smart
contracts, building things on it. And yeah, it’s tough to raise
the community with developers and I think a Ethereum has
done a super job of that and it really is is that developer focus. I mean their event is DevCon right? Or the event is for developers. That’s what they’re focused on, on their massive conferences that they do. It’s all for the developers. So that’s definitely
been the focus for them.>>It’s still tons of upside right? I mean, you said yesterday,
that you really don’t look for Blockchain developers,
you look for good devs>>Mm-hmm and I said to you afterwards, it’s probably ’cause there
aren’t enough of Blockchain devs.>>That’s not it really, for us it’s that, I didn’t… We’ve already solved
a lot of our problems. We’ve created a platform that
goes across many platforms. It syncs very easily, it
integrates many platforms in. We don’t work on the protocol
level of the platforms. Like we’re not actually
trying to solve problems and create those, creating a platform from scratch that maybe will be valuable a few years. We’re letting all of our
partners and platforms do that. We’re an app that is a… It’s something that’s
not necessarily requiring Blockchain devs to integrate. We do connect to Blockchains, that’s fine but we’re looking for
more traditional stuff that we’re doing that actually
going to monetize right now and it’s based on stuff and technology that doesn’t have to be created yet. So we’re not looking for
those massive problem solvers to develop protocols that
need to solve major problems. So we can have good JavaScript developers that’s what we require and we need and we can teach them internally what the skills they need on Blockchain. So actually we don’t
necessarily need Blockchain or we’d be looking for Blockchain devs. We’re looking for good
JavaScript developers.>>So guys like in traditional enterprise is that right?
>>Yeah that’s right. That’s why it’s easy
for us to get those in but if you’re looking to solve a problem, you’re looking to do this core stuff, working on protocol level stuff then you need someone who’s
been in the Blockchain space for a number of years
that can actually help you with that stuff and they’re
very hard to find right now.>>Yeah and they’re also
full-stack developers. It’s really a unique skill set. New language, full-stack,
they’ve got jobs.>>Yeah they’re working tons of projects. They’re demanding tons of money. Guys that have been developing on protocol stuff for five years. There’s very, very few. There’s so much more and
they’re so high in demand and also they want a lot more, you know, a lot more freedom in
the work they’re doing because they’re so high in demand and I have one guy that’s
that’s it that’s a rock star. He works just a few hours a week and when we do have critical issues or critical problems,
he’s our like consultant that can help us ’cause he’s
been in the space for a while. He teaches, he’s got an
Ethereum developer meetup that he runs in Toronto. So he’s our go-to guy but we’re also just not about Ethereum. We develop, we work with
75 different projects. It’s a wide range of things and we can also tap their communities, when we have problems. We go directly to you
know the Dash community, hey, there’s something going on here. Can you make sure that
we’re in the loop with this and we’ll go right with them and find the>>You should run your, Dave’s got a, we always talked about
digital transformation. Dave talks about a unique perspective. Share your digital transformation, the role of the developer
because that in the impact and get his reaction because we think that the developer on the
district line applications is probably the most important trend that I don’t think
mainstream is talking about. Because it also doesn’t really conflict with any other developer movement. It just adds more headroom but we see it from a
transformation standpoint.>>Our scenario is that you know, you talk with Cloud, SAS, big
data, mobile, social, Web 2.0. That stuff’s yesterday’s
news right and in Blockchain and the developments going
on in conferences like these really underscore that momentum and we see that organizations
that are succeeding today and taking advantage of that momentum, they have data as their
foundational, it’s at their core. And there’s so many traditional companies where human expertise is the core and data sort of bolted
on and that’s a big gap so we see Blockchain and this digital transformation converging and developers building this, new web, whatever you want to call it but this matrix of digital services which they tap to build new companies and so the role of the developer is, it’s always been critical but now it’s>>They got to build it up.>>Their stakeholders and in ways that we’ve
never seen before globally.>>Yeah and they’re also, I look at it as these
technologies are still very new. They’re going to take a long time to displace and disrupt other sectors and I think some people are
thinking that they’re doing, you know we’re going to
go from A to Z right away. I’ve taken the approach that we’re going to use a
lot of traditional stuff right now and we’re going
to build and make sure that we can monetize and
make sure it’s growing. We’re going to slowly be adding things in. Where I think if you
take a too long approach, you’re not be able to actually last. So a lot of stuff is doing what, you’re actually building
traditional stuff right now too. That’s what we do, like we use AWS quite a bit in the stuff that we do. We’re not going to centralized
storage for how we’re storing it’s just not proven yet,
it’s not scalable yet. It’s good take a long time to let stuff is and until then you have to
make sure that you’re actually staying in business, you
make sure you doing well. So it’s a using a mixture of both things and not going right to the end game.>>You have to de-risk that yeah and take advantage of cloud economics that are that are there today.>>Yeah I mean, if you think
about in the space right now. What sector has been
disrupted by Blockchain? What has been made
faster, better, cheaper? Right now in Blockchain. I can’t think of anything.>>Crypto kitties (laughs)>>Yes that’s a really important point.>>There hasn’t been much value.>>But that’s why I bring it
back to digital transformation because you think about
what’s been transformed by you know, digital. Obviously you know publishing,
books, you know, ads and I thought well is
it bits versus atoms?>>Well is it digital or
is it information transfer?>>Well its information transfer
that has disrupted that. Now it’s value transfer,
that’s what is coming right?>>Yes and so, but then
you’d assume that Blockchain, banking but banking
hasn’t been disrupted yet?>>Not yet, it’s going
to take a lot of time.>>And so insurance, healthcare
and these industries.>>Well I would say VCs
have been disrupted.>>But that’s
>>I get it.>>Here’s my premise, is
that risk is the factor that will determine disruption. Maybe it’s a little bit
of bits versus atoms but it’s the risk factors
associated with banking, healthcare, insurance,
defense, government stuff. The high risk, highly entrenched
businesses, organizations but eventually they will be disruptive.>>There’ll be signals.>>Yeah but it’ a lot of, when we first started Ethereum, there was, we had shirts, at the back would say, Dropbox in five lines
and that’s just not true. You know at the time this was the goal but when you realize
when you try to do it, this isn’t scalable this,
isn’t going to be a done-it, it’s going to be too
expensive to actually do it if you’re actually paying
for Ether’ to do it. It doesn’t make any sense,
so that was actually, even I was thinking that’s what
we’re going to be able to do. We’re a ways off for that. A problem need to be solved,
scalability, biggest problem. Interoperability between
all the different chains and how they’re all going to work together that needs to be solved. How you going to stop
these forking operations that happen at split communities when it went actually a coin forked or something happens
you get these battles. Those are problems need to be solved now. So we solved the problem
with smart contracts. Now that’s the second generation. Now we’re looking for other things like Cardan says they’re looking at the third generation stuff. It’s solving those problems
and we’re a ways off. So that’s why until then you got to still do things with tradition and don’t be afraid to use things that are that are proven
and work right now in order to get there, yeah. Aright Anthony, well great
to have you on the wrap-up. That’s day one,we’re seeing
a lot of great stuff. We had Halsey Minor on,
another industry pro. You seeing pros come into this business, you see you know the old dogs,
the new dogs, the young guns. I mean, it’s a really
an amazing community. I got to say reminds me of a lot of trends kind of coming together and that’s awesome work
that you guys have done. Thanks for coming on.>>Thank you of having me on again.>>We appreciate it. That’s the wrap-up a day
one, here at the Polycon 18. Token Economics,
Cryptocurrency, Blockchain. All the players are here, doing deals, making making it all happen. It’s the Cube, it’s a wrap up. Thanks for watching. (techno music)

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